Forward to Socialism 1

 

 

These attitudes spread across the planet:

 

Ok, having sex is quite nice, even a change is emnticing;

but most important for my happiness

is a community of people

I can trust.

 

 

I just want to enjoy life, I don’t want to be rich.

If necessary I am a casusal labourer;

but I always wear casuals.

 

 

People want to slow down.

People don’t like the US way of life.

 

Many states pledge for human rights, freedom, and democracy. That’s fine for a start to socialism. But still these are only words in all these states.

 

Forward to socialism: There is one tendency increasing in capitalism: Humans no longer let themselves play off against each other. In the WTO, the 90- and the 20-group unite. In the EU, the newcomers offer some sacrifice, Germany offers some sacrifice for the sake of unity. Latin America unites. Africa unites. China, Japan, Southeast, and India unite. Wherever people are no longer scared of their neighbours, capitalism suffers a defeat.

 

 

Adjust your concepts to your sensuous perception, not the other way round.

 

 

Kanjana Malaihom (Slumdwellers Network, Thailand): “We usually stereotype people by nation, but when we meet face to face it breaks down the borders between us, and generates collective strength to make change.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As long as I live,

I am of no age.

When I am dead,

I am very old.

 

 

Steve Richards: If ministers don’t want the blame for every fault, they need to revive local responsibility.

 

Africa: Botswana and Mauritius rejected international credits of WTO and IMF because they wanted to rely on their own resources which they mainly channelled into the education of their young people. As Nina Simone was singing: “Young, gifted, and black …” So they succeeded in democracy and production.

 

 

 

 

Hermann Scheer: The shift to renewable energy resources is a shift from  monopolists to many small tenderers and self-providers, self-sufficient communities.

 

 

Half of British workers keen to cut hours for better work-life balance

By Alan Jones

Published: 20 February 2006 Independent

Almost half of employees want to work fewer hours and millions would give up pay for a better work-life balance, according to a study published today.

Research for the Trades Union Congress (TUC) showed that workers in education and financial services were among those most keen to cut the hours of their working week.

Hotel and restaurant staff were least likely to want to work fewer hours for less pay, although the TUC said that reflected the large number of people who were employed part-time in the industry.

An analysis of the working habits of 60,000 households showed that manufacturing workers are also unhappy with the number of hours they worked.

The research was published ahead of Work Your Proper Hours Day on Friday. It has been calculated by the TUC that, if people put together all their unpaid hours from a year and theoretically ran those hours from 1 January, Friday would be the first day that they actually got "paid" for work.

The union has urged people to work their proper hours on Friday and take a full lunch break, and called on firms to thank staff for their hard work by treating them to lunch.

Brendan Barber, the general secretary of the TUC, said: "Most people enjoy their jobs most of the time, but nearly half would like to work fewer hours.

"More than two million are so desperate to downshift they would give up pay in return for a better work-life balance. But all our long hours are not making us more productive. Too many workplaces are gripped by a long hours culture, which staff and managers could work together to tackle."

Almost half of employees want to work fewer hours and millions would give up pay for a better work-life balance, according to a study published today.

Research for the Trades Union Congress (TUC) showed that workers in education and financial services were among those most keen to cut the hours of their working week.

Hotel and restaurant staff were least likely to want to work fewer hours for less pay, although the TUC said that reflected the large number of people who were employed part-time in the industry.

An analysis of the working habits of 60,000 households showed that manufacturing workers are also unhappy with the number of hours they worked.

The research was published ahead of Work Your Proper Hours Day on Friday. It has been calculated by the TUC that, if people put together all their unpaid hours from a year and theoretically ran those hours from 1 January, Friday would be the first day that they actually got "paid" for work.

The union has urged people to work their proper hours on Friday and take a full lunch break, and called on firms to thank staff for their hard work by treating them to lunch.

Brendan Barber, the general secretary of the TUC, said: "Most people enjoy their jobs most of the time, but nearly half would like to work fewer hours.

"More than two million are so desperate to downshift they would give up pay in return for a better work-life balance. But all our long hours are not making us more productive. Too many workplaces are gripped by a long hours culture, which staff and managers could work together to tackle."

 

 

 

 

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